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BIOTIN (VITAMIN B7)



Biotin or vitamin B7 is a B complex vitamin found in yeast, egg yolks, nuts and liver. Diabetics may be deficient in this vitamin, and may benefit from taking it as a supplement. Biotin is essential for healthy hair, skin and nails and is vital for embryo growth during pregnancy.

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BIOTIN (VITAMIN B7)

Biotin is a water soluble B-complex vitamin. Biotin (B7) is often known as the beauty vitamin and used to cure brittle nails, diminish bad skin, and promote strong, healthy hair growth. Biotin has other important roles in the body as well. It helps with metabolism of the food we eat and with cell growth. What Are B-Complex Vitamins? The B-complex vitamins are made up of 8 vitamins. While these vitamins are classed together, they are all actually unique. The B vitamins are found in the same food sources and are essential for metabolism and cell formation in the body. This class of vitamins includes: • Thiamine (B1) • Riboflavin (B2) • Niacin (B3) • Pantothenic acid (B5) • Pyroxidine (B6) • Biotin (B7) • Folic acid (B9) • Cobalamins (B12) Reasons to Take Biotin Along with helping give you healthy skin, nails and hair, biotin has other benefits. It may help lower blood sugar in some people with diabetes by helping enhance insulin in the body. It is often used to aid in wound healing. Biotin can also help those suffering with neurological disorders, heart disease, anxiety, and skin conditions, like seborrhic dermatitis that causes stubborn dandruff and scaling of the scalp. Recommended Daily Allowance You should be getting about 30 micrograms of biotin in your diet each day. However, biotin has been show safe for doses up to 10 milligrams per day. This is for both men and women. If possible, it's best to divide your biotin doses throughout the day. You doctor can prescribe higher doses of biotin if you have diabetes or other conditions this vitamin is known to help. What Happens If I Take Too Much? Biotin is generally regarded as safe and well tolerated, even with doses of up to 10 mg a day. There are no known adverse side effects for taking biotin. The maximum safe dose for biotin is unknown. While you may not be at risk of getting too much biotin, large doses can weaken the effect of certain medication you may be taking. And certain medications can also lower the biotin levels in your body. Medications for epilepsy and some antibiotics can prevent your body from absorbing this vitamin. Who's At Risk for Deficiency? People rarely become deficient in biotin. In most cases, when someone is deficient it is the result of an intestinal disorder that prevents the person from absorbing the nutrients the body needs. If you do become deficient, the effects are often seen in the skin and hair. Brittle hair and fingernails can be a sign of biotin deficiency. Natural Food Sources of Biotin You can get biotin from many foods you already eat each day. Whole-grain cereals, wheat germ and whole wheat bread are just some suppliers of biotin. Other foods rich in this vitamin include dairy products, egg yolks, chicken, soya nuts, peanuts, cauliflower, walnuts, beans, liver, salmon, molasses and brewer's yeast. Biotin is essential for metabolism of the foods you eat and cell formation, along with other great benefits. Biotin supplements are considered safe and are well-tolerated for most adults.